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  • Question: Are the classes impacted? Is it at all difficult to get the classes you want? - Anonymous
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    Hey! So I think, if I’m understanding your question right, you’re asking if the classes are crowded. The average class size is 24, but some have more and some have less. A lot of the prerequisite pre-med classes are more than that, just because a lot of people need to take the classes. In some large sections, that every college student needs to take, such as calculus, the classes are broken up into smaller sections at different times. Other classes, such as organic chemistry, the class starts off at 150 people, and slowly dwindles down as students drop the class. That all being said, it is definitely not difficult to get the classes that you need. I wrote a post a few months back regarding class registration, which you should be able to find about 20 posts ago. If you don’t get a class that you need, you can be overridden into it. The department heads are very helpful in that sense. 

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  • Question: Do you know where you are going to med school yet? - Anonymous
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    No, I don’t lol. I haven’t even started that process yet. What I’m doing is taking a year off and moving to Los Angeles to be with my boyfriend (we’ve been long distance for over 2 1/2 years). I’m presently trying to find a job that’s medically related out there, but I think I’m moving in about a month, which is scary! I definitely need the time off for personal reasons and just for a little break. I plan on getting more experience and maybe even taking a few classes in order to boost my GPA.

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  • Question: Are the professors helpful or are they more trying to weed out the weak ones from the class? - Anonymous
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    The professors are SO helpful! Honestly, every professor that I had here at Northeastern has been super friendly and helpful. On the syllabus, in the beginning of the semester, the professors will list their office hours. At those times, they are open to any questions that you may have about the class or even about some research the professor is doing. They will even sometimes list their number on there and their email address, so you can email them if you can’t make it to office hours. Most of my professors have also been open to scheduling an appointment if you didn’t have availability during their listed office hours. 

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  • Question: What classes would a typical Pre-Med Biology Major take freshman year, semesters 1 and 2? - Anonymous
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    I would definitely take biology 1 and biology 2, general chem 1 and general chem 2, and the rest is up to you. I would take some core classes in order to not be as science heavy because it college does take a bit of getting used to. There is definitely a ton of transition going on, so you don’t want to overload yourself.

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  • Question: Hi! I was just wondering what it's like being pre-med while doing co-ops. Are you planning to do 4 or 5 years as a Northeastern undergrad? If you're planning to do 5 years, how does that affect your application process to medical schools? Would you say that doing co-ops have helped or hindered you on your pre-med track? Thanks in advance! - perissologist
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    Hey! Awesome question. So I’m a bit of a different case. I actually transferred to Northeastern in my sophomore year and have only spent two years here. I will be finishing up college in three years. I actually have not gone on co-op, but I work part-time at the hospital as a newborn hearing screen and used this as my experiential learning experience. Personally, I think co-ops are great. They give you so much experience and a chance to really explore what there is out there. I was the type of person who has a set path and puts my head down and doesn’t see any other way to go. However, Northeastern has really changed me in that aspect. It has really opened up my eyes to seeing the outside world and that things don’t always go as planned. I did not plan on graduating in three years and I did not plan on taking a year or so off before medical school. A LOT of people take time off. I didn’t think I would need it, but I definitely do. If you do 4 or 5 years, it wouldn’t hinder you in either way. I would recommend 5 years, even, because you can study for your MCAT on co-op, if you do choose to go in right after undergrad. I hope this helps. This is definitely a very important question to ask and I am happy to tell you my experiences as pre-med!

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Integrated Endocrinology by Karim Meeran and John Laycock (2012, Paperback)

Anybody looking for an endocrinology book? Tell your friends! I’m selling mine from the semester.

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  • Question: How do you balance your social life with school work? - Anonymous
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    So I have to laugh at this question, not because you asked but because I really don’t do all that much. I’m so tired and stuff from work and school that I usually like to relax. But, I ALWAYS make time for relaxation or hanging out with friends, even in my busiest week. Its all about time management and making a schedule. I live my life by my Google Calendar. It really makes a big difference. Hope this helps!

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Honey Maid: Love

OMG. This made me smile so much.

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  • Question: yeah i am my bad - Anonymous
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    Hey, no problem! So, I personally didn’t do the NUin program and don’t know much about it besides the fact that you study abroad in one of six locations for the first semester of your freshman year. I’m going to give you a link to the NUin program website where you can get more information. I’m also posting this on the feed so that any of the other bloggers can check it out and maybe answer your question!